Monday, April 11, 2011

A Jumble of Journalism Links - 4.11.11


A Jumble of Journalism Links - What I’ve Been Reading

Net Impact: One man’s cyber-crusade against Russian corruption: This is literary and journalism: Late on a snowy evening, Alexey Navalny, a lawyer and blogger known for his crusade against the corruption that pervades Russian business and government, sat in a radio studio in Moscow. Tall and blond, Navalny, who is thirty-four years old, cuts a striking figure, and in the past three years he has established himself as a kind of Russian Julian Assange or Lincoln Steffens. On his blog, he has uncovered criminal self-dealing in major Russian oil companies, banks, and government ministries, an activity he calls “poking them with a sharp stick.” Three months ago, he launched another site, RosPil, dedicated to exposing state corruption, where he invites readers to scrutinize public documents for evidence of malfeasance and post their findings. Since the site went up, government contracts worth nearly seven million dollars have been annulled after being found suspect by Navalny and his army. Most remarkably, Navalny has undertaken all this in a country where a number of reporters and lawyers investigating such matters have been beaten or murdered.

The Casbah Coalition: Tunisia’s second revolution: About the popular revolution which forced the Tunisian President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and then Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi from power. Discusses the use of Facebook and other social media by the protesters.

The Artist Behind This Week's Heartbreaking New Yorker Japan Cover Explains How It Came About http://t.co/ciZ5KEf

Five myths about the future of journalism: There are few things journalists like to discuss more than, well, themselves and the long-term prospects for their industry. How long will print newspapers survive? Are news aggregation sites the future? Or are online paywalls — such as the one the New York Times just launched — the way to go? As media organizations plot their future, it’s worth discarding some misconceptions about what it will take to keep the press from becoming yesterday’s news.

raptorresource's live broadcast. The Raptor Resource Project brings you the Decorah Eagles from atop their tree at the fish hatchery in Decorah, Iowa. The live video feed is streamed online 24/7. At night an infrared light provides night vision to viewers through the cam. Infrared light is not visible to eagles, they do not see it or know it is there. Nothing to read here. Just enjoy.






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